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Archive for the ‘6 The Arts’ Category

Jane Austen
Bicentenary 2017

The 2017 Regency Season includes the Constable exhibition at the museum and a new display at the Royal Pavilion from June 2017, exploring Jane Austen’s relationship with coastal towns, and life in Brighton during her time, to mark the bicentenary of her death. ‘Jane Austen by the Sea’ will look at the seaside context of Austen’s plots and paint a picture of the leading resort of Brighton in the early 1800s, when it was a fashionable ‘watering place’ featured in novels like ‘Pride and Prejudice’. (more…)

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An appreciation by her grizzled contemporary, W. Somerset Maugham

Once when I was in Hollywood, I was invited to dinner by Miss Fanny Brice. It was by way of being a literary party. Aldous Huxley was there, his sardonic gusto in the horribleness of human beings not yet greatly mitigated by non-attachment and brotherly love. Dorothy Parker was there demure in black silk, but with a demureness fraught with peril to the unwary. I forget who the remaining guests were but they were evidently grand, for at dinner Dorothy Parker and I found ourselves seated together a good way down the table and well below the salt.  (more…)

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Aubrey Beardsley 1894 by Walter Sickert

Aubrey Beardsley 1894 by Walter Sickert

Aubrey Vincent Beardsley  – fin de siècle artist and draughtsman and artistic figure of the late 19th century – was born at 12 (now 31) Buckingham Road in 1872. He was baptised at St Nicholas Church and brought up in ‘genteel poverty’.  In 1885 Aubrey attended Brighton and Hove Grammar School, also in Buckingham Road (at the corner with Upper Gloucester Road) for 4 years, moving on to London by the early 1890s and moving between there and Paris for his remaining short life. (more…)

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The Visitor

Satan, in the form of a bewildered and naked Old Man, arrives in Brighton one dark and snowy December morning. That night a gull kills itself trying to get at Lucy Cuthman, a charity worker in her early 30s, through her bedroom window. A thick fog descends over the city – and lingers. The Old Man is twice attacked on the streets, before finding the squat where Geoffrey Cantor, our cultured and Byron-quoting narrator, lives. (more…)

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Thomas Hardy

thomas-hardy-2_2825734bI am afraid my column for this issue may turn out to be a lecture. It may even degenerate into a rant. The inspiration for it came to me about three weeks ago. I had recently introduced a selection of poems for the “Poetry for Pleasure” group, which meets at the Cornerstone Community Centre. In fact my wife, Nikki, read the introduction for me, because I was temporarily unable to speak. My choices were based on the teachings of a great literary critic, the late F. R. Leavis. He was among the first to direct our attention to the outstanding quality of the poetry written by Thomas Hardy (pictured) You may be surprised to hear that he wrote hundreds of poems. In fact during his adult life he was working on a poem almost every day. (more…)

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Friends Annual Lecture

Friends of St Michael’s Annual Lecture

Saturday November 5 @ 3pm in St Michael’s Church, Victoria Road, Brighton BN1 3FU

Given by Simon Martin, Artistic Director Pallant House Gallery, Chichester.

Talk with tea and cakes £12 on the door (free for Friends)

Funds raised this year go towards the repair of stonework and glazing of the west end great rose window

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